Posts for: February, 2013

Did you know that breastfeeding your infant not only has many health benefits, but also has dental benefits?  An article from the Journal of American Dental Association (Feb 2013) states that exclusively breastfed children through 6 months old have less of a chance of developing crooked teeth, which means that your child may need less extensive treatment from the orthodontist.  Also there have been several reports that show breastfed children have lower chances of getting several medical problems including middle ear infections (a leading cause of hearing loss in children), diarrhea, lower respiratory tract infections, leukemia, sudden infant death syndrome, asthma, and obesity.  Even the mothers that breastfeed also have reduced chances of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

I recommend that all infants are exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months and as food is slowly introduced into the child’s diet you won’t need to breastfeed as much.  Even after 1 year it is not a problem to continue breastfeeding.  At all times it is very important to care for your child’s teeth once they start to erupt.  Use a soft toothbrush with a smear of toothpaste to clean the teeth 2 times a day.  Also, it is important for children to have a “Dental Home” and we recommend this be done around 12 months old.  There are many other important factors to take into consideration and you should talk to an oral health care professional to find out the specific needs for your child.


By Mortimer Family Dentistry
February 17, 2013
Category: Oral Health
WhatIsTheDifferenceBetweenSnoringandSleepApnea

Nearly everyone is familiar with snoring, having either been awakened by a snoring, sleeping partner or by snoring so loudly that you wake yourself up. As if the sounds emanating from snoring weren't bad enough, snoring is no laughing matter and should never be ignored. And why? It can be a sign of other health issues.

Snoring occurs when the soft tissue structures of the upper airway (the back of your throat) collapse onto themselves, the tongue drops back and air is blocked in its movement through the mouth and nose into the lungs. These obstacles cause a vibration that produces the snoring sound. Snoring can also be caused by large tonsils, a long soft palate, a large tongue, the uvula (the tissue in the back of the throat that dangles like a punching bag), and/or fat deposits.

If snoring is more severe, it may denote a medical condition called Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA; or just “sleep apnea”). It occurs when the upper airway collapses causing significant airflow disruption or even no airflow whatsoever for 10 seconds or more and can leave you feeling tired, depressed, irritable, as well as cause memory loss and poor concentration. But have no fear; you are not alone, as millions of people worldwide have been diagnosed with this condition. There are also numerous treatment options that we can discuss with you — should you be diagnosed with this problem.

You can learn more about sleep apnea by reading the Dear Doctor article, “Snoring & Sleep Apnea.” Or if you are ready for a thorough examination and to discuss your snoring, contact us today to schedule a consultation.


By Mortimer Family Dentistry
February 03, 2013
Category: Oral Health
IronChefCatCoraProtectingYourChildrensTeethStartsEarly

When Cat Cora is not doing battle as the first female chef on the Food Network's hit series Iron Chef America, she is busy caring for the needs of her four active young sons. This includes monitoring the food they eat and their oral hygiene habits.

The busy chef, restaurateur, author, philanthropist and television personality recently revealed in an interview with Dear Doctor magazine that it all started when her four sons were little. She got rid of bottles and sippy cups as soon as possible to prevent tooth decay. She also started exposing her boys to a wide variety of spices and foods when they were infants — for example, by putting cinnamon in their baby cereal. Cat limits the amount of sugar in their diet by using fruit puree in baked goods and BBQ sauces, or the natural sugar substitute Stevia. Furthermore, Cat reports, “my kids have never had fast food.”

Cat is right on target with her approach to her children's oral health. In fact, we are often asked, when is the right time to schedule a child's first dental appointment? Our answer surprises some people — especially those expecting their first child.

The ideal time to take your child to the dentist is around age 1. Why so young? A baby's first visit to the dentist sets the stage for lifelong oral health. Besides, tooth decay can start very early. Baby Bottle Tooth Decay (BBTD), as the name suggests, impacts children who often go to sleep sipping a bottle filled with a liquid containing natural or added sugars, such as formula, fruit juice or a fruity drink mix. Another condition, Early Childhood Caries (ECC), is often found in children who continuously use sippy cups (again, filled with sugary liquids), children who breast feed at will throughout the night, children who use a sweetened pacifier, and children who regularly take sugar-based oral medicine to treat chronic illness.

To learn more about this topic, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Age One Dental Visit.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment. And to read the entire interview with Cat Cora, please see the article “Cat Cora.”




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Mortimer Family Dentistry

810-743-5131
4495 S. Center Road Burton, MI 48519